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Ana SayfaMiddle EastTaliban Government Covered the Faces of Mannequins in the Showcase!

Taliban Government Covered the Faces of Mannequins in the Showcase!

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Taliban softening policies on the show after initially ordering mannequins to be removed or beheaded The order is based on a strict interpretation of Islamic law that prohibits sculptures and images of the human form.

Under Taliban rule, mannequins in women’s clothing stores in Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan, are an unforgettable sight, their heads wrapped in sacks of material or wrapped in black plastic bags. The hooded mannequins are an image of the Taliban’s bigoted rule over Afghanistan. But in a way, they are also a small show of resistance and creativity through the disguised merchants of Kabul.

Initially, the Taliban wanted the mannequins to be completely beheaded

Shortly after they seized power in August 2021, the Taliban Ministry of Vice and Virtue decided that all mannequins should be removed from windows or beheaded, in accordance with nearby media.

They based the order on a strict Islamic regulation that bans statues and paintings in human form because they can be worshipped as idols – but it also fits with the Taliban’s campaign to keep girls out of the public eye.

Some clothes sellers complied. But others pushed back

They complained that they would not be able to display their clothes beautifully or that they might damage valuable mannequins. The Taliban needed to change their order and allowed the shop owners to cover the mannequins’ heads as an alternative.

The shop owners then had to balance between obeying the Taliban and appealing to customers. The kind of solutions they found are on display on Lycee Maryam Street, a middle-class business street lined with garment shops in the northern part of Kabul.

The shop windows of houses and showrooms are lined with mannequins in evening dresses and outfits full of color and embellishments, all with headscarves of various kinds. In one shop, the mannequins’ heads were hidden in custom-made sacks made of the same fabric as the traditional dresses they were modeling. One, dressed in a pink dress embroidered with seashells, had a matching dark red headdress. Another, dressed in a red robe elaborately embroidered with gold, was almost elegant in a pink velvet mask with a golden crown on her head.

“I can’t cover the mannequins’ heads with plastic or unsightly things because that would make my window display and my store uncomfortable,” said owner Bashir. Like other owners, he spoke to the Associated Press if he could be most easily identified by his first call for fear of retaliation.

Shop owners want to make matters attractive – the economic system collapsed because the Taliban took over and the subsequent cutoff of international funding plunged almost the entire population into poverty.

Elaborate outfits have often been popular at weddings in Afghanistan, which even before the Taliban were generally segregated by gender, putting girls in danger of wearing their best within the conservative society of the US. Under Taliban rule, weddings are one of the few ultimate opportunities for social gatherings. But by winning so nervously, they have become much less compelling.

Bashir said their sales were 1/2 of what they used to be.

“People don’t care anymore about buying wedding, evening and traditional clothes,” he said. “People think bigger about eating and survival.”

Hakim, another shop owner, draped aluminum foil over the heads of mannequins. He found it added a positive glow to his merchandise. “I took an opportunity out of this danger and prohibition and did it to make the mannequins more attractive than before,” he said.
It can’t all be so problematic. In one shop, mannequins in sleeveless aprons all had black plastic bags on their heads. The owner said he had no extra money. Aziz, another store owner, noted that Ministry of Alms and Virtue vendors often patrol stores and shops to make sure mannequins’ heads are cut off or wrapped in blankets.

He disputed the Taliban’s justification for the rules. “Everyone is aware that mannequins are not idols and no one will worship them. In all Muslim countries mannequins are used to show clothes.” Few male models can be seen in shop windows and they are also veiled, suggesting that the government is using the ban uniformly.

The Taliban first of all said that they would not impose the same harsh rules on society as they did during their first rule in the 1990s. But step by step, they imposed more restrictions, especially on women. They banned women and girls from going to school after the sixth grade, barred them from most jobs and required them to cover their faces when they went out.

One day the other day, a girl shopping on Lycee Maryam Street looked at the hooded mannequins. “When I see them, I feel and worry that these mannequins are also caught and trapped,” said Ms. Rahima, who made the best first visit. “I feel like an Afghan woman behind these shop windows, deprived of all her rights.”

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Taliban softening policies on the show after initially ordering mannequins to be removed or beheaded The order is based on a strict interpretation of Islamic law that prohibits sculptures and images of the human form.

Under Taliban rule, mannequins in women’s clothing stores in Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan, are an unforgettable sight, their heads wrapped in sacks of material or wrapped in black plastic bags. The hooded mannequins are an image of the Taliban’s bigoted rule over Afghanistan. But in a way, they are also a small show of resistance and creativity through the disguised merchants of Kabul.

Initially, the Taliban wanted the mannequins to be completely beheaded

Shortly after they seized power in August 2021, the Taliban Ministry of Vice and Virtue decided that all mannequins should be removed from windows or beheaded, in accordance with nearby media.

They based the order on a strict Islamic regulation that bans statues and paintings in human form because they can be worshipped as idols – but it also fits with the Taliban’s campaign to keep girls out of the public eye.

Some clothes sellers complied. But others pushed back

They complained that they would not be able to display their clothes beautifully or that they might damage valuable mannequins. The Taliban needed to change their order and allowed the shop owners to cover the mannequins’ heads as an alternative.

The shop owners then had to balance between obeying the Taliban and appealing to customers. The kind of solutions they found are on display on Lycee Maryam Street, a middle-class business street lined with garment shops in the northern part of Kabul.

The shop windows of houses and showrooms are lined with mannequins in evening dresses and outfits full of color and embellishments, all with headscarves of various kinds. In one shop, the mannequins’ heads were hidden in custom-made sacks made of the same fabric as the traditional dresses they were modeling. One, dressed in a pink dress embroidered with seashells, had a matching dark red headdress. Another, dressed in a red robe elaborately embroidered with gold, was almost elegant in a pink velvet mask with a golden crown on her head.

“I can’t cover the mannequins’ heads with plastic or unsightly things because that would make my window display and my store uncomfortable,” said owner Bashir. Like other owners, he spoke to the Associated Press if he could be most easily identified by his first call for fear of retaliation.

Shop owners want to make matters attractive – the economic system collapsed because the Taliban took over and the subsequent cutoff of international funding plunged almost the entire population into poverty.

Elaborate outfits have often been popular at weddings in Afghanistan, which even before the Taliban were generally segregated by gender, putting girls in danger of wearing their best within the conservative society of the US. Under Taliban rule, weddings are one of the few ultimate opportunities for social gatherings. But by winning so nervously, they have become much less compelling.

Bashir said their sales were 1/2 of what they used to be.

“People don’t care anymore about buying wedding, evening and traditional clothes,” he said. “People think bigger about eating and survival.”

Hakim, another shop owner, draped aluminum foil over the heads of mannequins. He found it added a positive glow to his merchandise. “I took an opportunity out of this danger and prohibition and did it to make the mannequins more attractive than before,” he said.
It can’t all be so problematic. In one shop, mannequins in sleeveless aprons all had black plastic bags on their heads. The owner said he had no extra money. Aziz, another store owner, noted that Ministry of Alms and Virtue vendors often patrol stores and shops to make sure mannequins’ heads are cut off or wrapped in blankets.

He disputed the Taliban’s justification for the rules. “Everyone is aware that mannequins are not idols and no one will worship them. In all Muslim countries mannequins are used to show clothes.” Few male models can be seen in shop windows and they are also veiled, suggesting that the government is using the ban uniformly.

The Taliban first of all said that they would not impose the same harsh rules on society as they did during their first rule in the 1990s. But step by step, they imposed more restrictions, especially on women. They banned women and girls from going to school after the sixth grade, barred them from most jobs and required them to cover their faces when they went out.

One day the other day, a girl shopping on Lycee Maryam Street looked at the hooded mannequins. “When I see them, I feel and worry that these mannequins are also caught and trapped,” said Ms. Rahima, who made the best first visit. “I feel like an Afghan woman behind these shop windows, deprived of all her rights.”

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